Hampshire Mills Group
HOME
Up
MILLS BOOK
MILLS OPEN
LIBRARY
LISTED MILLS
MILL HISTORY
HMG ACTIVITY
NEWSLETTERS
SNIPPETS
MILLS OVERSEAS
CONTACT
LINKS

 

 

Back Up

Page 7

Newsletter 117, Summer 2017   © Hampshire Mills Group

 

Quidhampton Mill, Overton

 

Richard Waldram

 

Part 2:  Mill Machinery

The last issue covered the history of the mill and the mill building.  Part 1

This article will describe the milling machinery left as it was when milling ceased in 1939.

 

THE GROUND FLOOR

This is a ground floor plan of the mill. 
There is a single water wheel turning two pairs of millstones on the floor above.

 

 

In the western bay of the building there is a small bucket wheel driving a water pump.  It was inserted sometime after 1921 to supply a tank up the hill which provided water to the newly built Station Bungalows.  There is evidence that this bay may originally have housed a second water wheel.  Firstly, there are three waterways under the building of which one is likely to be an overflow sluice leaving two for water wheels.  A waterway runs beneath this bay.  Secondly, there is a grain chute on the second floor in the right position to feed grain to the stones of a wheel in this bay and thirdly, there appears to have been no other use for this large area.

The Water Wheel

The cast iron wheel is 3.7m in diameter and 1.6m wide, turning on a circular iron bound wooden shaft.  The wheel was cast in two halves bolted together and fitted to the shaft by wooden wedges.  This allowed it to be assembled in the pit without having to dismantle any of the building.  It does not bear any visible makerís marks.  It is flanked by brick walls.

The Sluice Gate

Here are some of the iron buckets of the water wheel and the gear operating an iron sluice gate just upstream of it, which allowed the miller to start and stop the wheel.

 

 

The Pit Wheel, Wallower
and Great Spur Wheel

 

The pit wheel and wallower are cast iron but the great spur wheel is made of wood.  The stone nut and shaft are of cast iron.  The underside of the stationary bedstone on the floor above can be seen.  It will be noted that the stone nut and the great spur wheel are not properly aligned, and the baulk of timber which acts as the bearing for the vertical shaft has partially rotted away, allowing the whole shaft to drop.

 

 

 

 

The view below from the east shows the iron bound wooden vertical shaft on its bearing, the wallower, and the great spur wheel.  The pit wheel is behind.

Tentering Gear

The turn screw was used for adjusting the height of the stone nut shaft and thus the gap between the stones. 

 

THE STONE FLOOR

The Mill Stones

 

This is one of the two running stones, 117cm in diameter.  It is probably made of several pieces cemented together and bound with iron hoops.  The running stone had to be very accurately balanced about its centre to avoid vibration.  This was done by placing lead discs in any of the four recesses cemented into the upper surface.

 

(Editor's note : all the stones furniture seems to be missing.)

 

 

 

 

The inscription on the recess cover reads:

 

MILLSTONE BALANCE PATENTEES
CLARKE AND DUNHAM, MARK LANE, LONDON, 1869

 

The Crown Wheel and Sack Hoist

 

 

 

The wooden crown wheel is redundant.  A smaller cast iron wheel has been inserted above it, engaging with a vertical cast iron wheel which drives the sack hoist spindle.  By putting tension on two or three turns of rope around the spindle from the bin floor above, the operator could use the power of the water wheel to lift heavy sacks of grain from the ground to the second floor.

 

 

The lifting arm is connected by a lever to a cord leading to the floor above. Allowing the weighted lever to fall lifted the vertical cogwheel off the cast iron crown wheel to disengage the sack hoist.

 

 

The Bins

One of two grain bins viewed from the first floor.  The spout for feeding grain into the eye of the runner stone is missing.

One of two bins on the second floor for feeding grain into the hoppers.

 

THE BIN FLOOR

One of two pulley blocks for the sack hoist rope.

 

 

 

The upwards-opening trap door for the sack hoist.  The hinges are made of leather.  As a safety measure, the doors close by gravity when the sack has passed through.

 

The east end of the bin floor (left).  A new purlin can be seen on the left.  The old ones have been left lying on the floor.  This is where the millerís little daughters played Ďhousesí in the 1920ís.

 

   

 

Back Up


HOME ] Up ] MILLS BOOK ] MILLS OPEN ] LIBRARY ] LISTED MILLS ] MILL HISTORY ] HMG ACTIVITY ] NEWSLETTERS ] SNIPPETS ] MILLS OVERSEAS ] CONTACT ] LINKS ]

horizontal rule

Copyright © 2017 Hampshire Mills Group
Registered as a Charity - 1116607